Breaking: U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA Extends Compliance Date for Electronically Submitting Injury, Illness Reports

Amerimix
BMJ Stone
Echelon Masonry
EZG Manufacturing
Federated Insurance
Fraco USA, Inc.
Hohmann and Barnard, Inc.
Hydro Mobile, Inc.
iQ Power Tools
Kennison Forest Products, Inc.
Mortar Net Solutions
Non-Stop Scaffolding
Pullman Ermator
SPEC MIX LLC
Stabila
Tradesmen's Software, Inc.
August 27, 2012 3:00 PM CDT

Largest shake table test research awarded Raymond C. Reese Prize

NEESWood Capstone project research paper recognized

By

All that dead strategy will do is keep you busy and broke.

All that dead strategy will do is keep you busy and broke.
In 2009, Simpson Strong-Tie collaborated with academia on the NEESWood Capstone project in Japan, the world’s largest earthquake shake table test. A research article based on that test was awarded the 2011 Raymond C. Reese Research Prize by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

The research paper, “Experimental Seismic Response of a Full-Scale Six-Story Light-Frame Wood Building,” co-authored by John W. van de Lindt, M.ASCE, Shiling Pei, M.ASCE, Steven E. Pryor, M.ASCE, Simpson Strong-Tie, H. Shimizu and H. Isoda, describes testing and results from the NEESWood Capstone project.

The Raymond C. Reese Research Prize is awarded annually to a notable achievement in research related to structural engineering, with special consideration for how the research can be used. The award was presented at SEI and ASCE’s 2012 Structures Congress in Chicago on March 29-31.

The NEESWood Capstone project was developed to test new design methods for multistory, wood-frame buildings during large seismic events, and featured a seven-story, 40- by 60-ft. condominium tower with 23 one- and two-bedroom living units and two retail shops on the ground level. The condo building was subjected to and withstood several earthquakes created by Japan's E-Defense shake table. The test was also intended to provide a landmark data set to the seismic engineering research community.

"The testing done in Japan shows that performance-based design for light-frame wood structures works. This will allow the engineering and building community to provide safer, better performing buildings in the most cost-effective manner,” noted Simpson Strong-Tie International Director of Building Systems Steve Pryor, who co-authored the paper.


About the Author

Desiree Aquino is a Marketing Communications Specialist at Simpson Strong-Tie.

 

Related Articles

More Masonry Headlines

“The ‘MCAA Safety Advantage” will help us all become safer contractors.”

Mackie Bounds
Brazos Masonry, Inc.
MCAA member since 1991

Learn More