Amerimix
BMJ Stone
Echelon Masonry
EZG Manufacturing
Federated Insurance
Fraco USA, Inc.
Hohmann and Barnard, Inc.
Hydro Mobile, Inc.
iQ Power Tools
Kennison Forest Products, Inc.
Mortar Net Solutions
Non-Stop Scaffolding
Pullman Ermator
SPEC MIX LLC
Stabila
Tradesmen's Software, Inc.
My 2-year-old nephew, Rowan, is shown on the brickyard at South Georgia Brick Co. on a hot day in Albany, Ga.
My 2-year-old nephew, Rowan, is shown on the brickyard at South Georgia Brick Co. on a hot day in Albany, Ga.
December 2, 2012 7:00 AM CST

The future, near and far

From the editor

By

As 2012 leaves the building, here’s what I know: We have an industry full of people just as strong as masonry itself. I am not sure what the next four years will hold for any of us. But I do know that most of our industry weathered a hell of a storm during the last four.

Next year, whether we continue to bounce back or flatten somewhat, we still are far from where we stood in 2009 and 2010. Heads no longer hang down in despair and gloom when our staff attends trade shows, meetings and events. Companies are able to do what they do again, including looking to the future and what positive growth it holds.

The near future looks a lot greener than it once did. Sustainability is a real component to how we do business, and that will only strengthen, year after year.

The near future also looks more technical and digital than ever. From iPads on the jobsite to contractor software back at the office, we are working more efficiently than ever. Social media gives companies unique identities and exposure. Building Information Modeling and the design-build concepts create maps and records for the life of large construction projects. Every project can have a pedigree, if the contractors so desire.

The far future is a little trickier, but it is in our hands. We need to promote masonry. Masonry needs to be everywhere. I have had big players – suppliers – to our industry ask me why masonry still is relevant. We need to use our passion about our industry to educate others at every turn.

The far future also will depend on our ability to keep skilled workers. High school and technical school programs are strong and commendable, but we need to increase this in all areas of the country. Skilled labor is a good thing, and we need it if masonry is to thrive.

Our industry isn’t without worry, but we are solid. Masonry is solid. Masonry isn’t going anywhere, and neither are we.


About the Author

Jennifer Morrell was the editor of Masonry magazine. She has 20 years of experience in the publishing industry as a writer and editor, covering such topics as real estate and construction, insurance, health care, relationships and sports. A graduate of The University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism, she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in magazines and is an award-winning newspaper columnist.

 

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