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Mason contractors should keep an orderly and organized jobsite
Mason contractors should keep an orderly and organized jobsite
September 6, 2014 8:00 AM CDT

Feng shui on the jobsite

From the editor

By

Remember that neighbor you had as a kid with the messy house? Our mothers would compare our messy rooms to those messy neighbors’ homes, since that messy family had set the bar for clutter and disarray. My fiancé’s messy neighbors were “The Hammers.” His late mother used to describe anything messy as being “as bad as The Hammers’ house.”

Today in our family, The Hammers’ house is a metaphor for anything messy, chaotic or all-around destroyed. Sometimes I compare my daughter’s playroom to The Hammers’ house, even though I never actually saw The Hammers’ house when it was in its prime states of messiness – the 1970s. If a bad storm comes through, it leaves destruction “as bad as The Hammers’ house.” Even a crazy event or situation can be “Hammers-like.”

This brings me to the differences between an orderly and organized jobsite, where mason contractors and their employees follow all the rules and regulations they’re supposed to and wear all of the PPE they should, and just the opposite: The Hammers’ jobsite. Improper scaffold setup, a missing hardhat here, materials scattered there – all of these violations are just awaiting that shiny, new fine from OSHA.

The September issue of Masonry addresses many aspects of the jobsite. In “Staying Safe on the Jobsite,” we examine the most common jobsite safety hazards and even consult directly with OSHA as to what they look for on their (sometimes surprise) visits to your site.

Originally published in Masonry magazine.


About the Author

Jennifer Morrell was the editor of Masonry magazine. She has 20 years of experience in the publishing industry as a writer and editor, covering such topics as real estate and construction, insurance, health care, relationships and sports. A graduate of The University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism, she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in magazines and is an award-winning newspaper columnist.

 

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