Masonry Careers

A wide variety of careers are available within the masonry industry from mason to instructor to project manager. Depending upon your interests, you could pursue opportunities in many different areas of masonry. Several examples of possible careers within the industry are listed below.

Brick and Block Masons

Lay and bind building materials, such as brick, structural tile, concrete block, cinder block, glass block, and terra-cotta block, with mortar and other substances to construct or repair walls, partitions, arches, sewers, and other structures.

Tasks:

  • Calculates angles and courses and determines vertical and horizontal alignment of courses.
  • Breaks or cuts bricks, tiles, or blocks to size, using edge of trowel, hammer, or power saw.
  • Cleans working surface to remove scale, dust, soot, or chips of brick and mortar, using broom, wire brush, or scrapper.
  • Fastens or fuses brick or other building material to structure with wire clamps, anchor holes, torch, or cement.
  • Sprays or spreads refractory material over brickwork to protect against deterioration.
  • Measures distance from reference points and marks guidelines to lay out work, using plumb bobs and levels.
  • Lays and aligns bricks, blocks, or tiles to build or repair structures or high-temperature equipment, such as cupola, kilns, ovens, or furnaces.
  • Removes burned or damaged brick or mortar, using sledgehammer, crowbar, chipping gun, or chisel.
  • Mixes specified amount of sand, clay, dirt, or mortar powder with water to form refractory mixture.
  • Applies and smoothes mortar or other mixture over work surface and removes excess, using trowel and hand tools.
  • Examines brickwork or structure to determine need for repair.

Skills:

  • Mathematics
  • Equipment Selection
  • Repairing
  • Monitoring
  • Product Inspection

Abilities:

  • Information Ordering
  • Manual Dexterity
  • Visualization
  • Extent Flexibility
  • Dynamic Strength

Work Activities:

  • Handling and Moving Objects
  • Performing General Physical Activities
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
  • Getting Information Needed to Do the Job
  • Implementing Ideas, Programs, etc.

Interests:

  • Consequence of Error
  • Importance of Being Sure All Is Done
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate
  • Using Hands on Objects, Tools, Controls
  • Standing

Estimator

Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.

Tasks:

  • Analyzes blueprints, specifications, proposals, and other documentation, to prepare time, cost, and labor estimates.
  • Prepares estimates for selecting vendors or subcontractors, and determining cost effectiveness.
  • Reviews data to determine material and labor requirements, and prepares itemized list.
  • Prepares estimates used for management purposes, such as planning, organizing, and scheduling work.
  • Prepares time, cost, and labor estimates for products, projects, or services, applying specialized methodologies, techniques, or processes.
  • Computes cost factors used for preparing estimates for management and determining cost effectiveness.
  • Conducts special studies to develop and establish standard hour and related cost data or to effect cost reduction.
  • Consults with clients, vendors, or other individuals to discuss and formulate estimates and resolve issues.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
  • Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills:

  • Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.

Abilities:

  • The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

Work Activities:

  • Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Interests:

  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Inspector

Inspect structures using engineering skills to determine structural soundness and compliance with specifications, building codes, and other regulations. Inspections may be general in nature or may be limited to a specific area, such as electrical systems or plumbing.

Tasks:

  • Inspects bridges, dams, building, and foundation for conformance to specifications and codes.
  • Reviews and interprets plans, blueprints, specifications, and construction methods to ensure compliance to legal requirements.
  • Measures dimensions and verifies level, alignment, and elevation of structures and fixtures to ensure compliance to building plans and codes.
  • Approves and signs plans that meet required specifications.
  • Records and notifies owners, violators, and authorities of violations of construction specifications and building codes.
  • Issues violation notices, stop-work orders, and permits for construction and occupancy.
  • Confers with owners, violators, and authorities to explain regulations and recommend alterations in construction or specifications.
  • Reviews complaints, obtains evidence, and testifies in court that construction does not conform to code.
  • Maintains daily logs, inventory, and inspection and construction records and prepares reports.
  • Evaluates premises for cleanliness.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills:

  • Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.

Abilities:

  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.

Work Activities:

  • Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Interests:

  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Instructor

Teach or instruct students. Can include industrial, commercial and government training instructors; and adult education teachers and instructors who prepare persons to operate industrial machinery and equipment and transportation and communications equipment. Teaching may take place in public or private schools whose primary business is education or in a school associated with an organization whose primary business is other than education.

Tasks:

  • Conducts on-the-job training, classes, or training sessions to teach and demonstrate principles, techniques, procedures, or methods of designated subjects.
  • Presents lectures and conducts discussions to increase students' knowledge and competence, using visual aids, such as graphs, charts, videotapes, and slides.
  • Observes and evaluates students' work to determine progress, provide feedback, and make suggestions for improvement.
  • Plans course content and method of instruction.
  • Prepares outline of instructional program and training schedule and establishes course goals.
  • Selects and assembles books, materials, supplies and equipment for training, courses or projects.
  • Administers oral, written, or performance tests to measure progress and to evaluate effectiveness of training.
  • Determines training needs of students or workers.
  • Corrects, grades, and comments on lesson assignments.
  • Develops teaching aids, such as instructional software, multimedia visual aids, computer tutorials, or study materials for instruction in vocational or occupational subjects.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills:

  • Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Teaching others how to do something.
  • Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Abilities:

  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).
  • The ability to focus on a single source of sound in the presence of other distracting sounds.

Work Activities:

  • Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
  • Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them.
  • Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Interests:

  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Jobsite Supervisor or Foreman

Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers and their helpers. May perform both supervisory and management functions, such as accounting, marketing, and personnel work and may also engage in the same construction trades work as the workers they supervise.

Tasks:

  • Supervises and coordinates activities of construction trades workers.
  • Directs and leads workers engaged in construction activities.
  • Assigns work to employees, using material and worker requirements data.
  • Confers with staff and worker to ensure production and personnel problems are resolved.
  • Suggests and initiates personnel actions, such as promotions, transfers, and hires.
  • Analyzes and resolves worker problems and recommends motivational plans.
  • Examines and inspects work progress, equipment and construction sites to verify safety and ensure that specifications are met.
  • Estimates material and worker requirements to complete job.
  • Reads specifications, such as blueprints and data, to determine construction requirements.
  • Analyzes and plans installation and construction of equipment and structures.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures.
  • Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.

Skills:

  • Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.
  • Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Teaching others how to do something.
  • Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
  • Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Abilities:

  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

Work Activities:

  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
  • Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Interests:

  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Product Sales Representative

Sell mechanical equipment, machinery, materials, and supplies.

Tasks:

  • Recommends and sells textile, industrial, and construction equipment, materials, supplies, and services utilizing knowledge of machine operations.
  • Contacts current and potential customers, visits establishments to evaluate needs, and promotes sale of products and services.
  • Computes installation or production costs, estimates savings, and prepares and submits bid specifications to customer for review and approval.
  • Submits orders for product and follows-up on order to verify material list accuracy and delivery schedule meets project deadline.
  • Arranges for installation and test-operation of machinery and recommends solutions to product-related problems.
  • Appraises equipment and verifies customer credit rating to establish trade-in value and contract terms.
  • Demonstrates and explains use of installed equipment and production processes.
  • Reviews existing machinery/equipment placement and diagrams proposal to illustrate efficient space utilization, using standard measuring devices and templates.
  • Inspects establishment premises to verify installation feasibility, and obtains building blueprints and elevator specifications to submit to engineering department for bid.
  • Attends sales and trade meetings and reads related publications to obtain current market condition information, business trends, and industry developments.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
  • Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills:

  • Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Teaching others how to do something.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.
  • Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.
  • Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Using mathematics to solve problems.

Abilities:

  • The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures.
  • The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Work Activities:

  • Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.
  • Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems, or process-related topics.

Interests:

  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Project Manager

Plan, direct, coordinate, or budget, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, and implementations.

Tasks:

  • Plans, organizes, and directs activities concerned with construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems.
  • Confers with supervisory personnel to discuss such matters as work procedures, complaints, and construction problems.
  • Inspects and reviews construction work, repair projects, and reports to ensure work conforms to specifications.
  • Studies job specifications to plan and approve construction of project.
  • Directs and supervises workers on construction site to ensure project meets specifications.
  • Contracts workers to perform construction work in accordance with specifications.
  • Requisitions supplies and materials to complete construction project.
  • Interprets and explains plans and contract terms to administrative staff, workers, and clients.
  • Formulates reports concerning such areas as work progress, costs, and scheduling.
  • Dispatches workers to construction sites to work on specified project.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures.
  • Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
  • Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Skills:

  • Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.
  • Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Abilities:

  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.

Work Activities:

  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.
  • Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.
  • Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them.

Interests:

  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Quality Control Technician

Apply engineering theory and principles to problems of layout or production, usually under the direction of engineering staff. May study and record time, motion, method, and speed involved in performance of production, maintenance, and other worker operations for such purposes as establishing standard production rates or improving efficiency.

Tasks:

  • Studies time, motion, methods, and speed involved in maintenance, production, and other operations to establish standard production rate and improve efficiency.
  • Observes workers operating equipment or performing tasks to determine time involved and fatigue rate, using timing devices.
  • Prepares charts, graphs, and diagrams to illustrate workflow, routing, floor layouts, material handling, and machine utilization.
  • Recommends revision to methods of operation, material handling, equipment layout, or other changes to increase production or improve standards.
  • Records test data, applying statistical quality control procedures.
  • Observes worker using equipment to verify that equipment is being operated and maintained according to quality assurance standards.
  • Recommends modifications to existing quality or production standards to achieve optimum quality within limits of equipment capability.
  • Evaluates data and writes reports to validate or indicate deviations from existing standards.
  • Aids in planning work assignments in accordance with worker performance, machine capacity, production schedules, and anticipated delays.
  • Prepares graphs or charts of data or enters data into computer for analysis.

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills:

  • Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Abilities:

  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.

Work Activities:

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Interests:

  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Stone Masons

Build stone structures, such as piers, walls, and abutments. Lay walks, curbstones, or special types of masonry for vats, tanks, and floors.

Tasks:

  • Mixes mortar or grout and pours or spreads mortar or grout on marble slabs, stone, or foundation.
  • Sets stone or marble in place, according to layout or pattern.
  • Smoothes, polishes, and bevels surfaces, using hand tools and power tools.
  • Cleans excess mortar or grout from surface of marble, stone, or monument, using sponge, brush, water, or acid.
  • Digs trench for foundation of monument, using pick and shovel.
  • Lays out wall pattern or foundation of monument, using straightedge, rule, or staked lines.
  • Removes sections of monument from truck bed and guides stone onto foundation, using skids, hoist, or truck crane.
  • Shapes, trims, faces, and cuts marble or stone preparatory to setting, using power saws, cutting equipment, and hand tools.
  • Positions mold along guidelines of wall, presses mold in place, and removes mold and paper from wall.
  • Finishes joints between stones, using trowel.
  • Lines interiors of molds with treated paper and fills molds with composition-stone mixture.
  • Repairs cracked or chipped areas of ornamental stone or marble surface, using blowtorch and mastic.
  • Aligns and levels stone or marble, using measuring devices, such as rule, square, and plumb line.
  • Drills holes in marble or ornamental stone and anchors bracket.

Skills:

  • Equipment Selection
  • Product Inspection
  • Operation and Control
  • Repairing
  • Monitoring

Abilities:

  • Static Strength
  • Wrist-Finger Speed
  • Dynamic Strength
  • Explosive Strength
  • Visualization

Work Activities:

  • Performing General Physical Activities
  • Handling and Moving Objects
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
  • Drafting & Specifying Technical Devices, etc.
  • Operating Vehicles or Equipment

Interests:

  • Using Hands on Objects, Tools, Controls
  • Outdoors
  • Hazardous Situations
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate
  • Importance of Being Sure All Is Done